“Fucking” Splint

“Fucking” Splint

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The title of this post refers to the position of the splint more than the splint itself or the associated pain. Welcome to my sense of humor. 😀

With all the stitch pattern development I have been conducting, my tendonitis spread from my major knuckle to my palm knuckle, requiring increased mobilization. Thankfully, I have many old needles to incorporate as splints. The only problem I have now us maintaining the splint due to tape tears. I need something better!

Innovation

The good news is that my tendonitis is not a result of crocheting and knitting; the bad news is that I need to recreate my website for the meager business I conduct via the internet.

I have been working on the computer for the last two days and my finger is starting to get sore. The doctor had told me to try and keep the finger extended, but I never noticed the tendency – at least for my hands – is for the fingers to be curled.

I had this set of 16-inch circular needles that are way too small for me to even work on. I tried giving them away, but there were no takers. Good to know they can have other uses!

😀

Working With Rayon

You've Got Your Troubles Shawl
ŠA Hooker’s World

This is a shawl I am making for a friend of mine, Cathy. I have named this project You’ve Got Your Troubles – by The Fortunes – Shawl. Well, I’ve got mine; That’s how the song goes.

Cathy chose the yarn from one of Newton’s Yarn Country’s parking lot sales before showing me the pattern. Her yarn choice is like a rayon, very slippery. Having worked with rayon before, I did not think much about her choice. Of course, this was before she gave me the pattern she liked. The pattern (The Shawl – Collared Shawl from the book Crochet Your Way by Gloria Tracy and Susan Levin) calls for a 70% mohair, 30% silk blend, which might be a lot easier to work with because of the hairs, and crochet hook sizes G, H, I, J & K, beginning with the K.

The first attempt went well from the foundation chain except that using such a large hook with such a fine medium caused the foundation chain stitches to twist on themselves, making stitch identification and consistency difficult. On the third attempt I got the idea to crochet the foundation chain around a length of waste yarn to prevent the stitches from twisting on themselves. This was a very important lesson learned.

I was still struggling with tension, and I think because of that, I kept loosing stitches. I am a counter, but at this point, I am losing patience. I am counting as I crochet, double-checking when I am off. Another lesson I have learned is to count stitches while the project lays flat on a table versus in holding the project in mid-air.

Another problem is the stitch identification. At least three times I have lost stitches on the decrease row. Because the stitching is so loose, it is hard to identify the decrease; add to that the correct replacement of the stitch marker.

Pictured above is the first two rows, crocheted with a K hook. I am about to switch to the J hook and start the first set of decreases. My plan of action is to take my time, perhaps turn off the television and/or the music, so I can concentrate because I already told Cathy if this doesn’t work out, I am going to grab my size 8 steel hook and just improvise something.